Patrilinear Immigrant Colonists

Share

On my father’s side, fifty-seven immigrant colonists arrived in North America during the 1600s. Most came from England; others came from Scotland, Ireland, and Germany.

They settled in the Colony of Virginia, the Connecticut Colony, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the Province of Maryland, and the Province of Pennsylvania.

One died during the crossing and his wife died in the same year, leaving orphan children in the New World.

Ann Watts (1617 – 1676 [59]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 18 May 1617 (St Cuthbert’s, Wells, Somerset, England)
Death: 3 Feb 1676 (St. Mary’s County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1670 (Maryland)?
George MacKall (1600 – 1675 [75]). Scotland. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: Abt. 1600 (Dumfriesshire, Scotland)
Death: 30 Sep 1675 (St. George’s Hundred, St. Mary’s County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1670 (Maryland)?

Sarah Stebbins (1580 – 1649 [69]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1580 (England)
Death: 9 Sep 1649 (Springfield, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Anthony Dorchester (1595 – 1682 [87]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: Abt. 1595 (England)
Death: 28 Aug 1682 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Alice Lea (1575 – 1649 [74]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 11 Nov 1571 (Halesowen, Worcestershire, Shropshire, England)
Death: 1649 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Edward (Evardi) Orme (1570 – 1610 [40]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 13 Oct 1586 (Rayforth, Prescot, Lancashire, England)
Death: 1610 (Colony of Virginia)

Elizabeth Mehitabel Baker (1585 – 1629 [44]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1585 (Cardington, Bedfordshire, England)
Death: 1629 (Colony of Virginia)
John Larkin (1585 – 1629 [44]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 26 Feb 1585 (Cardington, Bedfordshire, England)
Death: 1629 (On Board Ship from England to Virginia Colony)

Mary Pinke (1596 – 1687 [91]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 18 May 1596 (London, Middlesex, England)
Death: 23 Aug 1687 (Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Francis Gabriel Holland (1595 – 1685 [90]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1595 (Westminster, London, England)
Death: 22 Jun 1685 (Anne Arundel County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1623 (Colony of Virginia)

Hannah Maria Wayland (1595 – 1660 [65]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1595 (Middlesex, England)
Death: 18 Jun 1660 (Charles City, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1638
David Jones (1594 – 1665 [71]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 4 Apr 1594 (Westminster, Middlesex, England)
Death: 20 Aug 1665 (Charles City, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)

Anne Exton (1596 – 1652 [56]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 15 Jul 1596 (London, England)
Death: 1652 (New Kent, New Kent County, Colony of Virginia)
Christopher Lewis (Louhes) (1592 – 1673 [81]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 14 May 1592 (St Mary Woolnoth, London, England)
Death: 1 Oct 1673 (Surry County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1635

Elizabeth Allison Bunting (1611 – 1696 [85]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1611 (England)
Death: 30 Mar 1696 (Colony of Virginia)
Jacob Blight (1579 – 1679 [100]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 14 Mar 1579 (Holsworthy, Devon, England)
Death: 14 Mar 1679 (Charles City, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1637 (Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)

John Waughop (1631 – 1677 [46]). Scotland. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1631 (Orkney Islands, Orkney, Scotland)
Death: 18 Mar 1677 (Piney Point, Somerset County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1658 (Province of Maryland)

Linda Suzzie Morrow (1616 – 1700 [84]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1616 (Kent, England)
Death: Bef. 1700 (Colony of Virginia)
Daniel Henry (1600 – 1700 [100]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1600 (England)
Death: 1700 (Shenandoah County, Colony of Virginia)

Moses Wheeler (1598 – 1698 [100]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 5 Jan 1598 (Bow, Middlesex, London, England)
Death: 15 Jan 1698 (Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony)
Arrival: 1638 (New Haven, Connecticut)

Jane Wheeler (1600 – 1674 [74]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 24 May 1600 (Gnosall, Newport, Staffordshire, England)
Death: 20 Sep 1674 (Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony)
Reverend Adam Aaron Blakeman (1596 – 1665 [69]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 10 Jun 1596 (Gnosall, Stafford, Staffordshire, England)
Death: 16 Mar 1665 (Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony)

Martha Kritchwell Chapman (1616 – 1662 [46]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 7 Apr 1616 (Tring, Dacorum Borough, Hertfordshire, England)
Death: 17 Dec 1662 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Hannah Wright (1626 – 1660 [34]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: Aug 1626 (Wrightsbridge, Essex, England)
Death: 16 Oct 1660 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Thomas Stebbins (1620 – 1683 [63]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 6 May 1620 (Bocking, Essex, England)
Death: 15 Sep 1683 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Margaret Hulins (1595 – 1684 [89]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 15 Jul 1595 (Rodborough, Gloucestershire, England)
Death: 28 Aug 1684 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Thomas Bliss (1590 – 1650). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1590 (Painswick, Gloucestershire, England)
Death: 14 Feb 1650 (Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut Colony)
Arrival: 1642 (New England)

Daniel Faulkner (1640 – 1700 [60]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1640 (England?)
Death: 1700 (Province of Pennsylvania)

Robert Bowman (1600 – 1671 [71]). Scotland. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1600 (Scotland)
Death: 17 Feb 1671 (Bermuda Hundred, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Mary Hayes (1605 – 1653 [48]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 3 Apr 1605 (Staffordshire, England)
Death: 12 Sep 1653 (Accomack County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1637 (Virginia)
Richard Hudson I (1602 – 1660). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 3 Apr 1602 (Tamworth, Staffordshire, England)
Death: 12 Sep 1660 (Hungars Point, Northampton County, Colony of Virginia)

Mary Day (1625 – 1680 [55]). England. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: Abt. 1625 (England)
Death: 21 Sep 1680 (Rappahannock County, Colony of Virginia)
Richard Hayworton (1620 – 1680). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1620 (England)
Death: Abt. 1680 (Rappahannock County, Colony of Virginia)

Sarah Gale Bond (1590 – 1650 [60]). England. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: 23 Apr 1590 (Whalley, Lancashire, England)
Death: 3 Apr 1651 (Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1642
Colonel John Chew (1587 – 1668). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 16 Jul 1587 (Chewton, Somerset, England)
Death: 24 Aug 1668 (York County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1623

Elizabeth Debnam (1637 – 1686 [49]). England. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1637 (England)
Death: 1686 (New Kent, New Kent County, Colony of Virginia)
Hugh Roy (1637 – 1680 [43]). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1637 (Northumberland, England)
Death: 1680 (Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1654

Deborah Ann Ferrers (1642 – 1698 [56]). England. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1642 (West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England)
Death: 10 Feb 1695 (Petsoe Parish, Gloucester County, Colony of Virginia)
John Buckner (1630 – 1694). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 2 Feb 1630 (Oxford, Oxfordshire, England)
Death: 10 Feb 1694 (Gloucester, Essex County, Colony of Virginia [?])

Catharine Peacock (1640 – 1660 [20]). England. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1640 (St Botolph, Aldgate, London, England)
Death: 1660 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)

Doctor Joshua Irby (1664 – 1746 [82]). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1664 (London, England)
Death: 19 May 1746 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Thomas St John (1640 – 1698 [58]). England. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1640 (St Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, England)
Death: 1698 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)

John Gatewood (1648 – 1706 [58]). England. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 23 Jul 1648 (London, England)
Death: 14 Nov 1706 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)

Major James Boughan (1650 – 1711 [61]). England. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1650 (England)
Death: 19 Jun 1712 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)

Thomas Batte (1634 – 1698 [64]). England. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 8 Feb 1634 (England)
Death: 1698 (Charles City, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Mary Billington (1634 – 1728 [94]). England. 7th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1634 (England)
Death: 16 Jan 1728 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)
Frances Newbill (1631 – 1651 [20]). England. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1631 (Staffordshire, England)
Death: 1651 (Essex County, Colony of Virginia)

Lucretia Johnston (1629 – 1709 [80]). Scotland. 7th great-grandmother.
Birth: 22 Mar 1629 (Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
Death: 14 Oct 1709 (Piscataway Creek, Essex County, Colony of Virginia)
John Burnett I (1610 – 1686 [76]). Scotland. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 25 Dec 1610 (Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
Death: 6 Feb 1686 (Old Rappahannock County, Colony of Virginia)

Mary Catherine Ferree (1679 – 1752 [73]). Germany. 7th great-grandmother.
Birth: 26 Mar 1679 (Lindau, Bavaria, Germany)
Death: 28 Mar 1752 (Northumberland, Northumberland County, Province of Pennsylvania)

Margaret McDonald (1678 – 1718 [40]). Ireland. 7th great-grandmother.
Birth: 15 Aug 1678 (Little Island, Waterford, Ireland)
Death: 1718 (Albemarle County, Colony of Virginia)
Charles Heard (1675 – 1746 [71]). Ireland. 7th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1675 (Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland)
Death: 1746 (Albemarle County, Colony of Virginia)

Sarah Allsop (1709 – 1755 [46]). Scotland. 6th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1709 (Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
Death: 1755 (Berkeley, Colony of Virginia)
James Hugh Henry (1706 – 1768). Scotland. 6th great-grandfather.
Birth: 8 Aug 1706 (Grampian Parish, Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
Death: 1768 (Augusta County, Colony of Virginia)

John Calfee (1715 – 1786 [71]). Ireland. 5th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1715 (County Sligo, Ireland)
Death: 15 Apr 1786 (Limeton, Warren County, Virginia, United States)

Mary Polly Anthony (1720 – 1781 [61]). Ireland. 5th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1720 (Belfast, Antrim, Ireland)
Death: 1781 (Prince Edward County, Virginia, United States)
John Porter (1711 – 1781 [70]). Ireland. 5th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1711 (Belfast, Antrim, Ireland)
Death: Jun 1781 (Prince Edward County, Virginia, United States)

Matrilinear Immigrant Colonists

Share

On my mother’s side, eighty immigrant colonists arrived in North America during the 1600s. Most came from England; others came from Scotland, Wales, Netherlands, Ireland, and France. One came involuntarily at first. A few made the transatlantic voyage two or more times.

They settled in the Colony of Virginia, the Connecticut Colony, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, New Netherland, the Colony of Rhode Island, the Province of Maryland, the Province of Pennsylvania, and the state of North Carolina.

Elizabeth Burroughs (1606 – 1660 [54]). England. 13th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1606 (Barnstable, Devon, England)
Death: 1660 (Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony)
Edward Jessup (1600 – Abt. 1630 [30]). England. 13th great-grandfather.
Birth: Abt. 1600 (Westchester, Cheshire, England)
Death: Abt. 1630 (Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony)

Elizabeth Merritt (Hall) (1572 – 1685 [113]). England. 13th great-grandmother.
Birth: 20 Jan 1572 (Eastbourne, Sussex, England)
Death: 9 Sep 1685 (Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Thomas Fryer (1578 – 1685 [107]). England. 13th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1578 (St. John’s Parish, Wapping, Middlesex, England)
Death: 9 Sep 1685 (Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Arrival: 1639 [61] (Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Joane Adria Gurganey Osborne (1597 – 1636 [39]). England. 13th great-grandmother.
Birth: 28 Jan 1597 (Little Hadham, Hertfordshire, England)
Death: 11 Sep 1636 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1635 [38] (Virginia Colony)
Captain Thomas Harris (1585 – 1634 [49]). England. 13th great-grandfather.
Birth: 10 Jun 1585 (Crixe [Creeksea], Essex, England)
Death: 11 Apr 1634 (Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Catherine Chapin (1600 – 1654 [54]). England. 13th great-grandmother.
Birth: 16 Nov 1600 (Berry Pomeroy, Devon, England)
Death: 8 Nov 1654 (Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Thomas Gilbert Gaye (1600 – 1642 [42]). England. 13th great-grandfather.
Birth: 16 Feb 1600 (Berry Pomeroy, Devon, England)
Death: May 1642 (Lower Norfolk, Colony of Virginia)

Elizabeth Joanne Hotten (1596 – 1626 [30]). England. 12th great-grandmother.
Birth: 30 Mar 1596 (Windsor, Berkshire, England)
Death: 1626 (Gloucester, Gloucester County, Colony of Virginia)
Reverend William Thomas Hampton (1592 – 1652 [60]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 28 May 1592 (Twickenham, Middlesex, England)
Death: 5 Sep 1652 (Gloucester, Gloucester County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1620 [28] (Colony of Virginia, aboard ship “Bona Nova”)

Dorothy Beauchamp (1584 – 1674 [90]). England. 12th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1584 (Cosgrove, Northamptonshire, England)
Death: 27 Jan 1674 (Swansea, Bristol County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
John Browne Sr. (1585 – 1662 [77]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1585 (Hawkedon, Suffolk, England)
Death: 10 Apr 1662 (Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Ralph “London” Hunt (1613 – 1675 [62]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 23 Feb 1613 (London, London, England)
Death: 6 Jan 1675 (Richmond County, New Netherland)

Mary Moore (1600 – 1674 [74]). England. 12th great-grandmother.
Birth: 28 May 1613 (Southwold, Suffolk, England)
Death: Nov 1674 (Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Joseph Grafton (1596 – 1682 [86]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1596 (Southwold, Suffolk, England)
Death: 24 Jun 1682 (Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Arrival: 1636 (Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Dorothy Tooley (1614 – 1687 [73]). England. 12th great-grandmother.
Birth: 25 Jun 1614 (Horncastle, Lincolnshire, England)
Death: 22 Jun 1687 (Kingston, King’s County [now Washington County], Colony of Rhode Island)

Thomas Ligon (1623 – 1675 [52]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 11 Jan 1623 (Walsgrave-on-Sowe, Warwickshire, England)
Death: 16 Mar 1675 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1649 [26] (Colony of Virginia)

Simon Hancock (1614 – 1654 [40]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 6 Jan 1614 (Devonshire, England)
Death: 22 Jun 1654 (Lower Norfolk County, Colony of Virginia)

Anne Houncell (1626 – 1670 [44]). England. 12th great-grandmother.
Birth: 28 Apr 1626 (Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England)
Death: Aft. 1670 (Williamsburg, Colony of Virginia)
Thomas Lane (1620 – 1670 [50]). England. 12th great-grandfather.
Birth: 6 Dec 1620 (St. Giles, Middlesex, England)
Death: Aft. 1670 (Williamsburg, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1637 [17]

Thomas William Bailey (1580 – 1620 [40]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1580 (Hawkedon, Suffolk, England)
Death: 20 Sep 1620 (Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)

Sarah Winston (1595 – 1660 [65]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1595 (Devon, England)
Death: 17 Jan 1660 (Prince George County, Colony of Virginia)
Joseph Pierson (1600 – 1660 [60]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1600 (England)
Death: 1660 (Curles Neck Plantation, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Captain Thomas Osborne (1613 – 1685 [72]) England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 12 Sep 1613 (Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England)
Death: 1685 (Coxdale, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Elizabeth Platt (1605 – 1688 [83]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 23 Jun 1605 (St James, Suffolk, England)
Death: 27 Oct 1688 (Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Edward Edmund Henchman (1605 – 1668 [63]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1605 (London, London, England)
Death: 27 Aug 1668 (Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Katherine Christian (1580 – 1646 [66]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1580 (Finchley, Middlesex, England)
Death: 1646 (Longfield, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Richard Burton (1580 – 1660 [80]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1580 (London, England)
Death: 10 Nov 1660 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1624 (Virginia)

Mary Sicily Farley (1610 – 1635 [25]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1610 (Arnold, Nottinghamshire, England)
Death: Abt. 1635 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Captain Robert Hutchins (1601 – 1634 [33]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 6 Sep 1601 (Arnold, Nottinghamshire, England)
Death: May 1634 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1626 (Virginia)

Marian Jane (Mary) Newport (1611 – 1646 [35]). England. 11th great-grandparent.
Birth: 14 Apr 1611 (Puddletown, Dorset, England)
Death: 1646 (Turkey Island, Henrico, Virginia Colony, United States)
Colonel William Hatcher 2nd (1614 – 1680 [66]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 14 Jan 1614 (Careby Manor, Lincolnshire, England)
Death: 1 Apr 1680 (Varina Dale Parish, Henrico, Virginia, United States)

Elizabeth Pendlet Thomas (1597 – 1660 [63]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 29 Mar 1597 (Rotherfield, Sussex, England)
Death: 1660 (Charles Parish, York, Virginia, United States)
Thomas Farmer (1594 – 1681 [87]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1594 (Easton Neston, South Northamptonshire, Northamptonshire, England)
Death: 12 Apr 1681 (Charles City County, Colony of Virginia)

Anne Rosamond Peck (1619 – 1672 [53]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 16 Nov 1619 (Beccles, Suffolk, England)
Death: 30 June 1672 (Norwich, New London County, Connecticut Colony)
John Mason (1600 – 1672 [72]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: Apr 1600 (Dorchester, Oxfordshire, England)
Death: 30 Jan 1672 (Norwich, New London County, Connecticut Colony)

Lydia Buckland (1632 – 1699 [67]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1632 (Weymouth, Dorset, England)
Death: 9 Sep 1699 (Old Saybrook, Middlesex County, Connecticut Colony)

Martha Doane (1620 – 1688 [68]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1620 (England)
Death: 5 Jan 1688 (Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Joseph Hardy (1620 – 1687 [67]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: Sep 1620 (Bridport, Dorset, England)
Death: 17 Apr 1687 (Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Mary Beall (1627 – 1724 [97]). Scotland. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1627 (Largo, Fife, Scotland)
Death: 1724 (La Plata, Charles County, Province of Maryland)
John Pottinger (1622 – 1710 [88]). Scotland. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1622 (Largo, Fife, Scotland)
Death: 1710 (Prince George’s County, Province of Maryland)
Arrival: 1684 (Maryland)

Mary Hunt (1626 – 1727 [101]). Wales. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1626 (Caernarvonshire, Wales)
Death: 17 Jan 1727 (Isle of Wight County, Colony of Virginia)
Owen Edward Griffith (1624 – 1698 [74]). Wales. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 18 Mar 1624 (Llŷn, Caernarvonshire, Wales)
Death: 15 Jul 1698 (Isle of Wight County, Colony of Virginia)

Elizabeth Sarah Cockcroft (1643 – 1685 [42]). Netherlands. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1643 (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)
Death: 7 Jul 1685 (Lynn Haven Parish, Lower Norfolk County, Colony of Virginia)

Rowland Jones (1640 – 1688 [48]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1640 (Swinbrook Barford Kimbell, Buckinghamshire, England)
Death: 23 Apr 1688 (Williamsburg, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1667 (Virginia)

Robert Jones (High Sheriff of Northumberland) Sr. (1633 – 1676 [43]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 30 Jun 1633 (Swinbrooke Manor, Aberford, Yorkshire, England)
Death: 1 Mar 1676 (Fleets Bay Neck, Northumberland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1653 (Virginia)

Mary Beheathland (1608 – 1720 [112]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1608 (St Endellion, Cornwall, England)
Death: 1720 (Warwick River, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1616 (Jamestown, Virginia)
Captain Thomas Bernard (1607 – 1651 [44]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1607 (Kingsthorpe, Northamptonshire, England)
Death: 10 Nov 1651 (Warwick, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1638 (Virginia)

Thomas Gleason (1607 – 1686). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 23 Aug 1607 (Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, England)
Death: 1686 (Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Arrival: 1642 (Massachusetts)

Alice Willoughby (1608 – 1644 [36]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1608 (King’s Stanley, Gloucestershire, England)
Death: 20 Feb 1644 (Sewells Point, Norfolk, Colony of Virginia)
Colonel Henry Sewell (Secretary of the Province of Maryland) (1600 – 1644 [44]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1600 (Little Hadham, Hertfordshire, England)
Death: 20 Feb 1644 (Sewells Point, Norfolk, Virginia, United States)
Arrival: 1632 (Virginia)

Alice Ganey (1598 – 1653 [57]). England. 11th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1596 (St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey, Surrey, England)
Death: 17 Nov 1653 (Norfolk, Lower Norfolk County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1622 (Virginia)
Francis Mason (1584 – 1648 [64]). England. 11th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1 Jan 1584 (London, Greater London, England)
Death: 15 Nov 1648 (Surry County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1624 (Virginia)

Susannah Hinckley (1625 – 1675 [50]) England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 6 Nov 1625 (Tenterden, Kent, England)
Death: 6 Nov 1675 (Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Reverend John Partington Smith (1614 – 1710 [96]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 11 Mar 1614 (Powerstock, Dorset, England)
Death: 2 Oct 1710 (Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Arrival: 1640 (Barnstable, Massachusetts)

Mary Ann Jeffries (1629 – 1697 [68]) England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1629 (Gloucestershire, England)
Death: 8 Dec 1697 (Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Stephen Bailey (1625 – 1697 [72]) England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1625 (Gloucestershire, England)
Death: 8 Dec 1697 (Kinsale, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)

Richard Hildreth (1605 – 1693 [88]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 23 Feb 1605 (Gainford, Durham, England)
Death: 23 Feb 1693 (Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)

Rose Whitlock (1624 – 1691 [67]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 6 June 1624 (Cholesbury, Buckinghamshire, England)
Death: 30 Nov 1691 (Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Abraham Parker (1612 – 1685 [73]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 6 Feb 1612 (Marlborough, Wiltshire, England)
Death: 12 Aug 1685 (Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony)
Arrival: 1644 (Massachusetts)

Lady Ann (Alice) Hopton (1651 – 1734 [83]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1651 (Canon Frome, Herefordshire, England)
Death: 1734 (Gwynedd, Montgomery County, Province of Pennsylvania)
Sir James Morgan (4th Baronet of Llantarnam) (1643 – 1718 [75]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1643 (Llantarnam Abbey, Monmouthshire, Wales)
Death: 30 Apr 1718 (Stowell, Gloucestershire, England)

Alice West (1640 – 1708 [68]). Ireland. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1640 (Ulster, Ireland)
Death: 1708 (New Kent, New Kent County, Colony of Virginia)

Joane Powell (1610 – 1698 [88]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 19 Feb 1610 (Ludlow, Shropshire, England)
Death: June 1698 (Lynch Point, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Robert Philpott (1610 – 1649 [39]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1610 (Folkestone, Kent, England)
Death: 19 DEC 1650 (Northumberland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1640 (Maryland)

Elizabeth Harte (1615 – 1659 [44]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1615 (London, London, England)
Death: 1659 (Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
William Storke (1621 – 1676 [55]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1621 (London, Middlesex, England)
Death: 20 May 1676 (Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1667 (Virginia)

Lettice Wale (1626 – 1665 [39]). England. 10th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1626 (Northumberland, England)
Death: 14 Sep 1665 (Lancaster, Lancaster County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1638
Rowland Lawson (1617 – 1661 [44]). England. 10th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1617 (Brough Hall, Catterick, Yorkshire, England)
Death: 8 May 1661 (Lancaster, Lancaster County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1642 (Virginia)

Stephen Beasley (1672 – 1747 [75]). Wales. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1672 (Wales)
Death: 4 Jan 1747 (Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Province of Pennsylvania)

Thomas Cheatham (1645 – 1726 [81]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1645 (Deane, Lancashire, England)
Death: 1 Aug 1726 (Henrico, Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1641

Mary Clark (1666 – 1696). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 24 Jan 1666 (Chaddesden, Derbyshire, England)
Death: Bef. 1696 (Henrico County, Colony of Virginia)

Samuel Bonum (1621 – 1692 [71]). Ireland. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1621 (Kinsale, Cork, Ireland)
Death: 1692 (Bonum’s Creek, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)

George Thomas Newton (1644 – 1694 [50]). England. 9th great-grandfather.
Birth: 13 Apr 1644 (Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire, England)
Death: 15 Jan 1694 (Norfolk, Independent Cities, Colony of Virginia)
Arrival: 1670 (Norfolk, Virginia)

Elizabeth Palethorpe (1605 – 1692 [87]). England. 9th great-grandmother.
Birth: 20 Jul 1605 (Nottinghamshire, England)
Death: Oct 1692 (Colony of Virginia)

Angell Chastain (1692 – 1735 [43]). France. 8th great-grandmother.
Birth: 1692 (Soubise, Charente-Maritime, Poitou-Charentes, France)
Death: 20 May 1735 (Manakin Town, Goochland County, Colony of Virginia)
John (Jean) Pankey (Panetier) (1660 – 1717 [57]). France. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 12 Nov 1685 (Soubise, Charente-Maritime, Poitou-Charentes, France)
Death: Jul 1717 (Manakin Town, Goochland County, Colony of Virginia)

Andrew Hampton (1698 – 1805 [107]). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 3 Jun 1698 (England)
Death: 8 Oct 1805 (Gilbert Town, Rutherford County, North Carolina, United States)

William Griffith (1686 – 1780 [94]). Wales. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 1686 (Llandegai, Caernarvonshire, Wales)
Death: 15 Aug 1780 (Danville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States)

Colonel George Washington Eskridge (1660 – 1735 [75]). England. 8th great-grandfather.
Birth: 30 Sep 1660 (Wales, Lancashire, England)
Death: 25 Nov 1735 (Sandy Point, Westmoreland County, Colony of Virginia)

Four Months Later

Share

Has it really been four months?

All of my previous efforts have come to naught.

I’ve been seeking refuge in my family, all the way back to the 1600s, when my people first began arriving in America. In total, about 150 colonists in my family tree. Most of them from England, most of them arriving in the Virginia Colony.

Thomas Mallon has said something like, “A guilty conscience is catnip to a novelist.”

Stay tuned.

Ethnomedicinal Plants of Jakholi

Share

Ethnomedicinal plants used by local inhabitants of Jakholi block, Rudraprayag district, western Himalaya, India

Singh A, Nautiyal MC, Kunwar RM, Bussmann RW
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2017 Aug 24;13(1):49
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5571566

Uttarakhand State in Northwestern India
Uttarakhand State in Northwestern India [Source: Filpro, Wikimedia Commons]
Investigators at H.N.B. Garhwal University, Practical Solution Consultancy Nepal, and the Missouri Botanical Garden conducted the first ethnomedicinal study in the Jakholi area of Rudraprayag district in the Uttarakhand state of northwestern India, to identify traditional medicinal plants used by the inhabitants to treat different ailments and document the associated knowledge of those medicinal plants.

Writing in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, the authors describe the Jakholi Block as an especially valuable home of a wide range of medicinal plants and repository of traditional knowledge about their therapeutic uses:

“The study area is interesting due to wide geographic and climatic condition and medicinal plants diversity of Jakholi Block makes this region an especially valuable treasure home of a wide range of wild medicinal and aromatic plants. Ethnic people, shepherd and traditional medicinal practitioner (Vaidyas and Daai) inhabit within a range of 700–3800 m asl and have high knowledge of medicinal plants uses. Local wooden and stone tools are commonly used to prepare medicinal remedies. Most diseases cured by local herbalist are common problems such as respiratory diseases, aches and pains, wounds and musculoskeletal ailments. Inhabitants often use local medicinal plants without prior advice of local traditional healers because they are using these plants since generations. In these connections, the present study was carried out to provide an overview of the knowledge of medicinal plants of the local and traditional healers of Jakholi area and to evaluate the status of these useful medicinal flora for identification of new drugs for health needs and suitable source of income for livelihood of inhabitants. We hypothesize that plant use at Jakholi would show similar response to other Himalayan regions, and that the local medicinal flora would have been overharvested.”

Working with 25 key participants including traditional healers, shepherds, and other local inhabitants, the team identified 78 medicinal species used to treat 14 different ailments including diseases of the skin and hair, gastrointestinal disorders, ophthalmologic complaints, and mental afflictions, among others.

Two species, Aconitum heterophyllum and Picrorhiza kurroa, were identified as particularly important ethnomedicinally as they have been used for generations and contain rich bioactive constituents. They are are also among 29 of the documented medicinal plant species that are listed as locally threatened due to premature harvesting and over-exploitation. ​In their conclusion, the authors also note that while older people still possess large traditional knowledge of plants and their therapeutic uses, outmigration among the young threatens the future of this traditional ethnomedicinal knowledge.

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Medicinal Plant Species of Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Share




Diversity of use and local knowledge of wild and cultivated plants in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa

Maroyi A
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2017 Aug 8;13(1):43
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5549312

Eastern Cape, South Africa
Eastern Cape, South Africa [Source: TUBS, Wikimedia Commons]
Alfred Maroyi of the Medicinal Plants and Economic Development Research Center, University of Fort Hare, conducted a study in six villages in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa, to assess useful plant species diversity, plant use categories, and local knowledge of both wild and cultivated useful species in the region.

Writing in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, Professor Maroyi notes that the majority of the inhabitants in the study sites are traditional isiXhosa speaking people who are highly dependent on natural resources for their livelihoods. Working with 138 local informants, Maroyi documented 125 useful plant species, more than a third of them exotic and the remainder native. Approximately 75 percent were collected from the wild, 21 percent cultivated, and 5 percent “spontaneous” (growing without the assistance of humans).

Aloe arborescens
Aloe arborescens [Photo: Andrew massyn, Wikimedia Commons]
Most of the identified species (62 percent) were used as ethnoveterinary and human medicines. Documented species considered to have potential in the development of new medicinal products with commercial value include Acacia karroo, Alepidea amatymbica, Aloe arborescens (Aloe candelabro), Aloe ferox, Aloe marlothii, Artemisia afra, Bulbine frutescens, Carpobrotus edulis, Elephantorrhiza elephantina, Gunnera perpensa, Helichrysum nudifolium, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Leonotis leonurus, Lippia javanica, Mentha longifolia, Pittosporum viridiflorum, Prunus africana, Tulbaghia alliacea, Tulbaghia violacea, Typha capensis, Withania somnifera, Xysmalobium undulatum, and Ziziphus mucronata.

Of these, A. amatymbica, G. perpensa, H. hemerocallidea, and P. africana are threatened with extinction mainly because of over-exploitation for the traditional medicine trade.

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified published research for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Medicinal Plants of Yalo, a Woreda in Ethiopia’s Afar Regional State

Share




An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal and edible plants of Yalo Woreda in Afar regional state, Ethiopia

Teklehaymanot T
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2017 Jul 5;13(1):40
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5499056

Afar Regional State, Ethiopia
Afar Regional State, Ethiopia [Source: TUBS, Wikimedia Commons]
Tilahun Teklehaymanot of the Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, conducted an ethnobotanical survey to document medicinal and edible plants used in Yalo, a woreda in Ethiopia’s Afar Regional State.

Writing in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, Professor Teklehaymanot describes the vulnerability of traditional knowledge in Afar:

“The people in the Afar region have the lowest health and education coverage in the country with the highest food insecurity. They are a traditional society that has native and unique information exchange system by word of mouth called ‘Dagu,’ which their livelihood is very much dependent on the information transferred through Dagu system. The information ranges from weather to availability of grazing lands for their animals, and peace and security of the region. Nevertheless, the cultural transformation, expansion of modern education and development in the area could detach the younger generation from such cultural values and pastoral systems that lead to loss of traditional knowledge in general, and knowledge of medicinal and edible plants in particular.”

Acalypha fruticosa
Acalypha fruticosa [Photo: J.M.Garg, Wikimedia Commons]
Working with 160 informants selected with the assistance of elders, the author documented 102 medicinal plant species used to treat human as well as livestock diseases. Particularly important plants (species reported by 15 and more informants and used as a remedy for multiple diseases) included Acacia mellifera, Acacia oerfota, Acalypha fruticosa, Acalypha indica, Balanites aegyptiaca, Balanites rotundifolia, Cadaba farinosa, Cadaba glandulosa, Cadaba rotundifolia, Celosia polystachia, and Indigofera oblongifolia.

The plants were used as remedies for a variety of conditions such as breast cancer, dyspepsia, epilepsy, herpes zoster, jaundice, lung infection, malaria, stomachache, bloody dysentery, and fever.

In his conclusion, the author recommends conservation to ensure sustainable use of the plants and protect the associated traditional knowledge.

“The edible plants are used as food security and generate the pastoralist economic. All the plants with medicinal and economic importance are collected from the wide and conservation is not practiced in the area. Hence, conservation of the plants in the home garden and in the natural vegetation is a necessity against the recurrent drought and climatic changes that negatively affect the vegetation of the area, to protect the associated traditional knowledge from fast disappearing and ensure sustainable use of the plants in the traditional healthcare system. The integration of edible plants in the food sufficiency strategies in the area has to be considered since animal productivity is severely affected by encroaching invasive plants and recurrent drought. The holistic soil and water conservation policy that is being implemented in other parts of the country has to be employed in the region to save the natural vegetation that is also the repository for the medicinal and edible plants for future pharmacological and nutritional studies.”

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified published research for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Phase II Study of Abemaciclib in Patients With Oligodendroglioma

Share

A Single-Arm, Open-label, Phase II Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Abemaciclib in Patients With Recurrent Oligodendroglioma

University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03969706

Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania [Photo: Penn Medicine]
Investigators at the University of Pennsylvania have started a Phase II, single-arm, open-label study looking how well abemaciclib (VerzenioTM, Lilly) works in patients with recurrent oligodendroglioma.

See additional details, including study location(s), eligibility criteria, contact information, and study results (when available) at ClinicalTrials.gov.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified clinical trials for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Medicinal Plants Used for the Treatment of Diarrhea in Ethiopia

Share




Medicinal Plants Used for Treatment of Diarrhoeal Related Diseases in Ethiopia

Woldeab B, Regassa R, Alemu T, Megersa M
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2018 Mar 18;2018
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5878875

Investigators from Jimma University and Hawassa College of Teacher Education conducted an inventory of plant species used in the treatment of diarrheal diseases by indigenous people of Ethiopia.

Writing in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the authors note that the World Health Organization has initiated a diarrhea disease control program to study traditional medicine practices and prevention approaches to the condition. Diarrhea is a leading killer of children, accounting for 9 percent of all deaths among children under age of five worldwide, with Sub-Saharan Africa having one of the highest child death rates due to diarrhea.

Allopathic study of antidiarrheal properties of medicinal plants used in Ethiopian traditional medicine is in early stages:

“Although there are a range of medicinal plants with antidiarrhoeal properties that have been widely used by local communities of Ethiopia, the effectiveness of many of these antidiarrhoeal traditional medicines has not been scientifically evaluated. Recently, a few of these medicinal plants have attracted considerable attention and studies being conducted to scientifically evaluate their antidiarrhoeal activities.”

The team recorded 132 plant species used to treat diarrheal diseases in Ethiopia, based on a review of studies published between 1965 and 2017.

Citrus limon
Citrus limon [Photo: WAH]
Among the most commonly used plants were Amaranthus caudatus, Brucea antidysenterica, Calpurnia aurea, Citrus limon, Coffea arabica, Cordia africana, Indigofera spicata, Lepidium sativum, Leucas deflexa, Rumex nepalensis, Stereospermum kunthianum, Syzygium guineense, Verbascum sinaiticum, Verbena officinalis, Vernonia amygdalina, and Zehneria scabra.

Most of the remedies were prepared from fresh parts of the medicinal plants, followed by dried forms, and a smaller group prepared either from dry or fresh plant parts. Additives like honey, salt, sugar, beer, milk, and butter were used to help make the plants suitable for oral administration.

The authors note that sufficient studies have not been conducted in the Afar, Benishangul Gumuz, Gambella, and Somali regions for the inventory to be considered complete.

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified published research for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Ethnobotany, Climate Change & Conservation Strategies in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán

Share




Ethnobotany of the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán: climate change and conservation strategies in the Colombian Andes

Rodríguez MA, Angueyra A, Cleef AM, Van Andel T
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2018 May 5;14(1):34
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5935911

Ritacuba Blanco, Parque Natural Sierra Nevada del Cocuy, Chita o Guican
Ritacuba Blanco, Parque Natural Sierra Nevada del Cocuy, Chita o Guican [Photo: Martin Roca, Wikimedia Commons]
Investigators at Leiden University, Universidad de los Andes, University of Amsterdam, Wageningen University, and Naturalis Biodiversity Center conducted an ethnobotanical inventory among local farmer communities in the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán in the Colombian Andes in an effort to determine the effects of vegetation change on the availability of useful plants in the face of expanding agriculture, deforestation, tourism, and climate change.

Writing in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, the authors note the importance of research to better understand the effect of climate change on human-vegetation dynamics:

“Climate change affects altitudinal plant distribution in high-elevation tropical mountains. Perceptions on climate change in mountain ecosystems indicate that local people can give relevant insights about climate change dynamics as they are narrowly acquainted with its surroundings. From an ethnobotanical approach, climate change affects human-vegetation dynamics, like altering the patterns of planting and harvesting in the Himalayas, disrupting traditional plant practices in British Columbia, and affecting the diversity of useful flora in alpine ecosystems, and therefore threatening the traditional knowledge associated with these plants. These studies stress the need to consider local people’s perspectives to reduce the impacts of climate warming. Changes in plant diversity as a consequence of climate processes show alarming effects on plant population over time. Predictions on the effects of climate warming in the Andean ecosystems include displacement, adaptations (physiological changes), and local extinction of plant communities. Ethnobotanical research in Andean mountain ecosystems have mostly focused on medicinal plant use by local communities. Research on non-medicinal plants of importance for the inhabitants of high altitude zones, or on local perceptions on the decline of useful plants related to climate change are lacking.”

The team worked with local farmer communities to record the ethnoflora of the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán, which has been protected as a Colombian national natural park since 1977 because of its fragile páramo (high altitude tropical wetland) ecosystems, extraordinary biodiversity, high plant endemism, and function as water reservoir.

In interviews, they posed the following questions:

  • What are the plant species used by the campesinos?
  • At what altitudes do they collect useful plants?
  • What is the proportion of native versus introduced species?
  • Have the campesinos noticed a reduction in plant availability?
  • Could potentially declining plant resources be associated with climate change?

They also walked into the field and along existing mountain trails with staff from the national park and local farmers to collect useful plant specimens, documenting 174 useful plants, 68 percent native to the area and 32 percent introduced.

The farmers noted a reduction of native and especially medicinal plant resources accessible to them, with species like Niphogeton dissecta being more difficult to find, having shifted to higher altitudes, possibly due to climate change. (Temperatures have increased 2 °C in the national park in less than four decades.)

In their conclusion, the authors stress the vital importance of placing local people as key actors to help prevent or at least mollify the degradation of the páramos and their cultural plant legacy:

“This study confirms the concern among local farmers about the melting snow, so it is crucial to include people’s perceptions on climate change to design effective conservation policies. During our workshops, we noticed that local farmers worried about the preservation of their natural resources. Local concerns can be solved with the implementation of environmental policies and active participation that take into account the local population needs. Courses on environmental conservation for local farmers are highly relevant, especially for those who are directly involved in the tourist business. Employees from the NNP-Cocuy, specialists on plant resources management and local people should work together to develop conservational strategies towards sustainable tourism and practices and accomplish the policies that were implemented since the opening of the NNP-Cocuy, such as obligatory-guided heritage tours, limited number of tourists, and no garbage disposal in the environment.”

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified published research for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

Medicinal Plants Used by Saraguro Community Healers in Ecuador

Share




Ethnobotany of Indigenous Saraguros: Medicinal Plants Used by Community Healers “Hampiyachakkuna” in the San Lucas Parish, Southern Ecuador

Andrade JM, Lucero Mosquera H, Armijos C
Biomed Res Int. Epub 2017 Jul 4
PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5514338

Investigators at the Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja (UTPL) conducted an ethnobotanical survey of the use of medicinal plants by community healers known as Hampiyachakkuna by the indigenous Saraguro people living in San Lucas Parish, Loja Province, Ecuador.

Writing in Biomed Research International, the authors note that this ethnobotanical knowledge is endangered by cultural changes:

“The community of healers locally known as ‘Hampiyachakkuna’ maintains the ancient medical treatments of the Saraguros. The ‘Yachak’ or ‘Hampi yachakkuna’ is the person who knows the curative properties of plants, animals, and/or minerals. Under the Andean cosmovision of the Saraguros ethnical group, the diseases they treat are thought to be produced by either cold or heat. As such, their natural medicines are classified as hot and fresh; and depending on the nature of the patient’s condition, different plants are selected for the treatment in accordance with this classification. However, although the knowledge regarding the usage of plants for medicinal practices has been transmitted orally from generation to generation, the Saraguros are experimenting cultural changes that threaten the preservation of their ancestral knowledge. These cultural changes lead to negative consequences such as the loss of traditional knowledge, a decline in the use of natural resources, and changes in the patterns of food intake, medical treatment, and, furthermore, their cosmovision. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to document and preserve their invaluable knowledge.”

Working with four healers from the Saraguro community – a Wachakhampiyachak (midwife), a Yurakhampiyachak (herbalist), a Kakuyhampiyachak (bone-healer), and a Rikuyhampiyachak (visionary) – the team documented 183 plant species used in 75 different curative therapies. Uses included mythological treatments, nervous system treatments, cold treatments, infection treatments, general malaise treatments, and inflammatory treatments of the liver and kidneys.

Siphocampylus scandens
Siphocampylus scandens [Photo: Dick Culbert, Wikimedia Commons]
Endemic medicinal species identified included Achyrocline hallii, Ageratina dendroides, Bejaria subsessilis, Brachyotum scandens, Dendrophthora fastigiata, Diplostephium juniperinum, Diplostephium oblanceolatum, Fuchsia hypoleuca, Huperzia austroecuadorica, Lepechinia paniculata, Phoradendron parietarioides, Siphocampylus scandens, and Salvia leucocephala. Most of the endemic plants in the group were determined to be in danger, threatened, or vulnerable.

The study was conducted under a technical and scientific collaborative effort of the UTPL, the Dirección Provincial de Salud de Loja, and the Consejo de Sanadores de Saraguro “with the objective of recognizing and recovering the traditional knowledge of herbal medicinal resources used by the Saraguro community”:

“Because of the increasing recognition of the importance of the different medicinal species used by the Saraguros and in an effort to preserve their knowledge, in this work we seek to contribute to the conservation strategy on the sustainable uses of the Ecuadorian medicinal biodiversity. The latter is considered a fundamental step in order to raise awareness of its cultural value and the importance of its preservation. By doing that, we intended to safeguard the popular knowledge concerning natural medicinal plants and to provide a baseline for future actions regarding scientific research programs, environmental education, social awareness, and sustainable natural resources exploitation…. The results of this research also aim at becoming a starting point to attract the attention of national and international tourists, in order to promote a self-sustaining development of the Saraguro community.”

Read the complete article at PubMed Central.

Send email to avery@williamaveryhudson.com for information about submitting qualified published research for sponsored posts on this blog.




The information on my blog is not intended as a substitute for medical professional help or advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.